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Rūpjmaizes kārtojums (layered Latvian rye bread dessert)

Rūpjmaizes kārtojums

As I already wrote, Latvians have some incredibly delicious desserts, a lot of them are made with rye bread, which is an essential part of traditional Latvian cuisine. There’s even rye breadcrumb ice-cream over here and yogurt with rye breadcrumbs – very tasty. Not to mention cream of bread, bread soup, etc etc. Even nowadays, as bread is losing its popularity (a lot of people are on a diet and think it’s too fattening), public opinion polls say an average Latvian eats up to 50 kg bread per year. And coarse rye bread is the sort which remains favourite throughout the years.

The dessert we will be talking about today is originally called Rūpjmaizes kārtojums, which means layers of bread. The most common method is to layer rye breadcrumbs, whipped cream, and cranberry or cowberry jam. Sometimes cream of cottage cheese is used instead. The dessert can be made in small individual ice-cream bowls or in a larger bowl and then cut in portions. We made it in a larger container for four and used mascarpone instead of whipped cream. Mascarpone has a richer taste than whipped cream; the only shortcoming is that it’s thicker and you’ll probably need to let sit your Rūpjmaizes kārtojums for at least 5 hours until the breadcrumbs saturate in jam and mascarpone. At least that’s what we did – and the result was very pleasing! Imagine rye breadcrumbs toasted with sugar and cinnamon, layered with tangy mashed cranberries, and topped with soft, vanilla-flavoured mascarpone; repeat once and top with those crunchy breadcrumbs. Sounds good, uh? And those fresh forest cranberries that Mom pureed with sugar came up really handy here: we store them in refrigerator and use for time-saving baking and dessert-making. Fresh cranberries can be replaced with cranberry jam, if you prefer.

Rūpjmaizes kārtojums

 

Ingredients

10 slices coarse rye bread (about 350g in total), slightly dried and crust removed
250g mascarpone cheese
4 tbsp sugar
1 tbsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp vanilla sugar
6 tbsp mashed cranberries (with sugar)
3 tbsp cream

Serves 4

 

Latvian rye bread

Grate slices of bread on a hand grater.

Rye breadcrumbs

In a non-stick pan, mix breadcrumbs, 2 tablespoons sugar, and cinnamon, and toast the mix on a medium heat for 20 minutes. Some lumps might appear as the sugar slightly melts. Keep stirring and breaking any lumps with a spatula. Set to cool (as you see, it’s better to cook the breadcrumbs in advance).

Toasting rye bread

Mix mascarpone cheese, 2 tablespoons sugar, cream, and vanilla sugar. Cream is used here to make the cheese more elastic.

Mascarpone

Divide the breadcrumbs in 3 parts, two of which are equal and one is slightly smaller in size (we’ll use it for topping).
Divide the mascarpone mix in two parts.
Put one part of the breadcrumbs on the bottom of your bowl. With a spatula or spoon, gently spread the mascarpone mix over them. Spread 3 tablespoons of mashed cranberries over the mascarpone mix. Repeat with bread, mascarpone, and cranberries. Top the dessert with a thinner layer of remaining breadcrumbs.

Making Rūpjmaizes kārtojums

Cover the bowl and set it in the fridge. Chill the dessert for 5 to 10 hours.

Rūpjmaizes kārtojums
Rūpjmaizes kārtojums
Rūpjmaizes kārtojums

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37 Responses

  1. I am so glad your back what a winner this is delicious!!!!! I love it!

  2. [...] Rūpjmaizes kārtojums equates to layers of bread, in Latvian. I think which I competence additionally incorrectly interpret it to super yum. Crumbled rye bread, churned thickk cream and crushed cranberries mix for a dessert with a demeanour which is undiluted for portion during the winter holidays. This fantastic recipe comes from Russian Season, an Eastern European food blog combined by a mom and daughter. And in box you were disturbed about bad translations, it’s combined in undiluted English with overwhelming step by step photographs. [...]

  3. [...] Rūpjmaizes kārtojums equates to layers of bread, in Latvian. I think which I competence additionally incorrectly interpret it to super yum. Crumbled rye bread, churned thickk cream and crushed cranberries mix for a dessert with a demeanour which is undiluted for portion during the winter holidays. This fantastic recipe comes from Russian Season, an Eastern European food blog created by a mom and daughter. And in box you were disturbed about bad translations, it’s created in undiluted English with overwhelming step by step photographs. [...]

  4. Christin says:

    Thanks so much for this yummy recipe! I made it this evening with my girls. We can hardly wait to try it in the morning!

  5. Daniel says:

    Rye bread in a desert sounds amazing. I love the flavor profiles of this dish and the beautiful execution as well.

  6. I would never think to use rye bread in a dessert, but your recipe sounds delicious. It is so pretty, too!

  7. [...] Rūpjmaizes kārtojums means layers of bread, in Latvian. I think that I might also incorrectly translate it to super yum. Crumbled rye bread, whipped cream and mashed cranberries combine for a dessert with a look that is perfect for serving during the winter holidays. This spectacular recipe comes from Russian Season, an Eastern European food blog written by a mother and daughter. And in case you were worried about bad translations, it’s written in perfect English with stunning step by step photographs. [...]

  8. [...] Rūpjmaizes kārtojums means layers of bread, in Latvian. I think that I might also incorrectly translate it to super yum. Crumbled rye bread, whipped cream and mashed cranberries combine for a dessert with a look that is perfect for serving during the winter holidays. This spectacular recipe comes from Russian Season, an Eastern European food blog written by a mother and daughter. And in case you were worried about bad translations, it’s written in perfect English with stunning step by step photographs. [...]

  9. Alina says:

    Christin, wonderful! I’d love to hear how you liked it!
    Daniel, Vegetable Matter, thank you so much - it’s really common here to use bread in desserts, I’ll post a recipe of ice-cream with rye breadcrumbs some day! We have it packaged and sold in supermarkets but you can make it at home as well!

  10. zerrin says:

    Never heard of using bread to make such a wonderful cakes. It looks awesome, so irresistable!

  11. Rosa says:

    What an amazing recipe! I’m going to have to try it for the holidays. It reminds me of a Mexican dessert my mother used to make for my father. The Mexican version uses toasted bread, cheese, raisins, and a heavy sugar syrup.

    I love your blog, by the way!

  12. rebecca says:

    Hi,
    I live in Australia but my grandfather is originally from Latvia so I’m keen to make this for him!
    I have a question - is cranberry jam the same as cranberry sauce? We have cranberry sauce readily available which is usually served with turkey at Christmas time (or used in sandwiches)but I have been unable to find cranberry jam. Would the jam be sweeter (the sauce is still pretty sweet but the jam might be sweeter?)? Perhaps I could add some sugar to the jars of cranberry sauce?
    Any hints would be much appreciated.

    • Inese says:

      Hi, Rebecca!
      I can advise you to use just cranberry souce - without sugar. That is the point of this dessert - sweet and sour taste. Or smash frozes cranberries with a little bit of sugar, also.
      So tell me - where do you get this bread in Australia - because it is quite specific thing …..?

      Sometimes I use to do this dessert with smashed red bilberries with a little sugar added - they are also quite sour.

      So, good luck anyway! :)

  13. rebecca says:

    Oh goodness! I just re-read this and saw that it says mashed cranberries. Sorry for misreading. I am sure I can work it out. We can only get frozen cranberries here but I’m sure I can sort that out!!!
    I am looking forward to giving it a go!

  14. Alina says:

    Zerrin: Thank you! I’ll try to post more bread desserts in the future - hopefully they could provide some inspiration for your own desserts!

    Rosa: oh really?? That sounds like something I’d LOVE to try! Do you have this dessert recipe posted anywhere in your blog?!

    Rebecca: oh yeah, I think there’re a lot of Latvian expats in Australia! Rebecca I’m not sure what cranberry sauce is like in terms of texture, is it very runny?.. And no, I don’t think you should add any more sugar to the sauce - I’m sure your grandfather remembers the taste of Latvian cranberries and they are REALLY REALLY sour! I’m sorry it’s always hard to think of ingredients available to everyone around the globe! :) But I guess cranberry sauce would do even better than a jam. I suggested jam as one of the possible options just because some people don’t like that sharp taste of freshly crashed cranberries.

  15. Rosa says:

    Oh, no, sadly I don’t have the recipe. (Actually, when I was a child, I was so Americanized I really hated the unusual Mexican-style bread pudding my mother made!)

    Now I’ll have to ask my mother for it. She’ll get a laugh out of that!

  16. rebecca says:

    Oh Rye bread is easy to come by here. I live in Adelaide in South Australia but I should think it would be available all over Australia. All the supermarkets sell it packaged up and most bakeries too.
    We have a German Bakery in a small town just out of Adelaide (originally settled by Germans) called Hahndorf. There are often German or European specialties available there. In fact, because most people in Australia originally came from other countries (some recently, some generations ago), we have a lot of different multicultural food options that have been brought by the people who came to live here. Our (food) market in the city is pretty diverse. Asian countries are obviously closer to Australia so there are lots of options from Malaysia, China, Japan, etc but there is also loads of Italian, Greek, Spanish and other food on offer from further afield. There was even a Russian food stall last time I went (which admittedly was a while ago). Sadly, there is not as much from Russia or Latvia in the way of restaurants around Adelaide. There was a Russian restaurant we took my Grandpa to years ago but it closed down not all that long after it opened.
    Anyway, that’s enough from me!

  17. Alina says:

    Rebecca, I’ve always wondered what it’s like to live in such a multi-cultural country as Australia. That must be simply exciting! As for Russian restaurants, I just think a lot of Russian dishes need to be adapted/tweaked before they can go on a restaurant menu! ;-) Sometimes they’re a little bit too heavy, but they’re an endless source of inspiration!

  18. Cindy says:

    This looks absolutely delightful, and such an easy recipe!! Will have a go at it tomorrow!!

  19. I tried this today - in honour of Latvian independence day on Thursday :) - but I feel the proportion of ingredients is way off. I used just 200 g grated rye bread (caramelised, of course) and 400 g of curd cheese instead of 250 g mascarpone - and I still felt there was way too much rye bread to balance that little amount of curd cheese (not talking about 250 g of mascarpone!)

    The flavour is nice, however, but I’ll use even more cream to rye bread next time.

    Greetings from Estonia,

    Pille

    • Alina says:

      Pille, that’s weird - I’m pretty confident about this recipe as it has been tested by Foodista editors. The curd cheese may have made the dessert drier. I think it’s still better to use the traditional whipped cream if you don’t wish to use mascarpone. Anyways, I’ll check the proportions next time I make this and post the corrections, if any!

  20. I just made a version of this and it was much more delicious than I expected - thanks! I’m attempting to make a dessert from every country in the world (~200), and this was my pick for Latvia :)

    • Alina says:

      Fiona, wow are you seriously making a dessert from every country in the world?! What a breath-taking idea!! Well at least this dessert doesn’t look as strange as another traditional Latvian sweet dish - bread soup (it’s dark-brown and grainy) - and believe me, that soup is delicious too!:)

  21. Latvian girl says:

    this is not the real recipe! in real you do not need to add mascarpone, just cream (beaten, i don’t know how to say it right:D)

    • Alina says:

      Latvian girl, if you had read my post you would have noticed the following lines:
      “The most common method is to layer rye breadcrumbs, whipped cream, and cranberry or cowberry jam. We made it in a larger container for four and used mascarpone instead of whipped cream. Mascarpone has a richer taste than whipped cream…”
      Of course you can always use whipped cream if you want to make the traditional version. But I prefer to add a personal touch to every dish I make. Thank you for your comment… and for leaving your contact info, lol :)

  22. Latvian girl says:

    if you need some recipes from our national cousine- than just write me to laumux_12@inbox.lv

  23. Denise says:

    This looks delicious and I’m looking forward to making it! :) I was wondering if anybody has tried to make it with different breads?

  24. Bobby Faver says:

    Sugar also contributes to the moistness of desserts and their tenderness. The flour or starch component in most desserts serves as a protein and gives the dessert structure. Different flours such as All-Purpose Flour or Pastry Flour provide a less rigid gluten network and therefore a different texture. Along with flour desserts may contain a dairy product.,..

    Newly released piece of writing provided by our personal blog
    <http://www.foodsupplementcenter.com/

  25. That dessert looks really elegant there. I try to experiment this with different breads, and see if would work.

  26. Elina says:

    When you say ‘Rūpjmaizes kārtojums’ it sounds like the dessert contains the worries (rūpes) of the chef. Correctly it would be ‘Rupjmaizes kārtojums’ without the lengthening mark ‘ū’.

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