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Almond Cranberry Biscotti

Almond Cranberry Biscotti

The Italy issue of Bon Appetit was splendid. I’ve bookmarked about a dozen recipes and already made Pasta al Pomodoro twice. Now I know how to make a smooth and silky pasta sauce :)

From this BA issue, I also learned that making biscotti is a doable task. Biscotti are one of my favourite Italian sweet treats, but I’ve never thought of making them at home. I thought I would need tons of almond flour or other ingredients that I would have to hunt for all around the city, while all I needed was a dash of almond extract. And almonds :) The BA recipe called for dried cherries and pistachios, but I opted for dried cranberries and almonds instead, because the pistachios they are selling here at the moment look ugly.

Surprisingly, my own biscotti looked and tasted quite similar to what I usually get as a gift for Christmas and Easter! The blend of almond, citrus zest, and cranberry flavours was divine! The only thing I did wrong was slightly over-bake them. They looked too moist all of the time, and then suddenly oups! they got over-baked. Next time I bake biscotti I will remove them from the oven while they still retain moistness, for they will harden as they cool. I’d like to try to make them with AP flour next time as well. I couldn’t find unbleached flour so I used 3/4 AP flour and 1/4 whole wheat flour, which  tinted the biscotti golden brown. I guess with 100% AP flour, they would have been even crispier and airier. But anyway. I’m very content with this recipe, that’s why I’m sharing it with you (with my tweakings), even though it’s not Eastern European :)

Almond Cranberry Biscotti

 

Almond Cranberry Biscotti
Adapted from Karen DeMasco’s Pistachio and Dried-Cherry Biscotti in Bon Appetit Italy Issue

Ingredients
1 1/2 cup AP flour
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup old-fashioned oats
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1 tsp vanilla sugar
2 large eggs
3 tbsp vegetable oil
1 tbsp orange zest
2 tsp lemon zest
1/2 tsp almond extract
1 cup dried cranberries, rinsed
1 cup unsalted almonds

makes about 4 dozen

 

Preheat oven to 180C.

In a large bowl, combine and mix first 8 ingredients.
In another bowl, whisk together eggs and next 4 ingredients.
Add egg mixture to flour mixture and stir until combined. Fold in cranberries and almonds.
Transfer dough to a floured surface; divide in half. Shape each dough half into a 16″ long log. Transfer logs to prepared baking sheet and slightly flatten each log.
Bake, rotating, sheet halfway through, until set, about 30 minutes.
Let cool for 15 minutes.
Reduce oven to 120C. Transfer biscotti to a work surface. Using a serrated knife, cut each log into 1/3″ thick slices. Arrange slices on baking sheets (you will need an additional sheet here).
Bake biscotti, rotating sheets halfway through, until crisp, about 40 minutes.
Almond Cranberry Biscotti

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Category: Beyond Eastern Europe

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11 Responses

  1. Miss Frangipane says:

    I love making biscotti, too. I make mine with 100% whole wheat flour, sometimes mixing in oat flour or millet flour. Cacao nibs and sesame seeds make great biscotti, too.

    Do you cook a lot with rhubarbs in Latvia? Rhubarbs are gorgeous these days!

    • Alina says:

      Wow!! Adding millet flour sounds terrific! I will try this next time.
      Oh yes, rhubarb is very popular here. I’ve already had a rhubarb clafoutis this season, mm :) But to bake at home, I’m still waiting for local organic rhubrabs - they should appear in the first days of June!
      By the way, I’ve heard that rhubarb should be picked and eaten strictly before 24th June - it is believed to become sort of “poisonous” later. I wonder if it’s just a local belief…

  2. It’s been quite a while since I’ve made biscotti. I wish I had some right now with ice coffee… mmm… sweet dreams :-)

  3. Cristina says:

    I’m bummed to have missed that Italy BA issue. My subscription starts in June :(

    Your biscotti looks like it turned out so good. I’ve been wanting to give it a try too, but just haven’t done so. Thank you for the inspiration. This may be the recipe I start with. =)

    • Alina says:

      Thank you Cristina ^_^ The June issue is great too - full of summer recipes. I didn’t get my May issue though. I think someone stole it from the mailbox!!

  4. Amanda says:

    They look scrumptious!

    I’ve always wanted to make biscotti, but nobody in my family likes how hard they are. Is it a lot of work with baking them twice?

    • Amanda says:

      P.S. I like how you’ve changed the look of your site a bit. Didn’t the line above “All texts and images copyright 2009″ (near the bottom of the page)used to be in green? Also, I like how you’ve updated the column about you, your mother, husband, and daughter. I sure hope Stano will make Halušky soon!It sounds cool!

    • Alina says:

      Hi Amanda! Well my aunt’s husband who comes from Italy always dips biscotti in his tea or coffee. So maybe you could suggest the same to your family :) although personally I don’t like how a beverage turns into a sweet soup :)
      When I first read the recipe I thought it would be a lot of work, but all you need in fact is just some patience!

  5. Leora says:

    Whole almonds??

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