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Mini Rogaliki

Chocolate Applesauce Rogaliki

Rogaliki are small crescent rollls filled with jam, marmalade, Tvorog or even raisins. I think the most common filling for Rogaliki however, is jam/marmalade. I’m not sure we ever had them at home when I was a kid, but some of my friends’ mothers and grandmothers used to bake these very often. Rogaliki are very good with tea or coffee, and they are budget-friendly. It’s been my dream to have warm Rogaliki for breakfast for many years now, and today this dream came true.
I made the dough ahead and refrigerated it overnight. Chilled dough was very comfortable to roll and cut. The unsweetened dough made with sour cream and a pinch of baking soda is flaky and soft, even though my Rogaliki were tiny. I was in the mood for something petite and delicate, so these crescent rolls came out more like soft filled cookies. Of course this means you have less filling in the centre - just for flavour - and it takes you longer to make them. Classical Rogaliki should be larger in size, with more filling inside; the original recipe yields 3 times fewer rolls than I made.
At first I was thinking of filling them with dark, rich apricot jam made by Stano’s Mom, but then I remembered about three little jars of a wonderful chocolate applesauce she gave to us, and used it instead. I must ask Stano’s Mom for the recipe when we are in Slovakia in summer; chocolate applesauce is something amazing! First you taste the chocolate, then the juicy tartness of apples comes through; there’s a lot of surprise in it! It’s great on crepes, pancakes, ice-cream, whatever. As a filling for Rogaliki too. It smelt like a chocolate factory when the rolls were baking!

Mini rogaliki

 

Adapted from May issue of Moy Rebenok
Ingredients
1 3/4 cup AP flour
100g sour cream
100g butter, softened but not melted
Pinch of salt
Pinch of baking soda
2-3 tbsp chocolate applesauce (more if making larger Rogaliki)
Powdered sugar

Makes 56 mini Rogaliki

 

In a large bowl, mix flour, baking soda, and salt. Cut butter into cubes and add to flour. Mix with a fork until uniform crumbly texture. Add sour cream and knead dough until smooth.
Let dough sit in a cool place for at least an hour. I refrigerated mine overnight.

Preheat oven to 180C.
Roll dough into a thin sheet and cut circles of it (e.g. using a saucer as a template). Cut each circle into 8 wedges. Repeat with remaining dough, you should have 7×8 wedges in the end.
Spoon a tiny bit of filling on the wider end of each wedge (using a small coffee spoon is a good idea) and roll up towards centre. Curve each roll into a crescent shape, if possible (it was difficult to do with these tiny ones).
Place Rogaliki onto prepared baking sheet, pointed side down. Bake for 25-30 minutes.
Dust generously with powdered sugar when ready.

Chocolate Applesauce Mini Rogaliki
Mini Rogaliki
Mini Rogaliki Filles With Chocolate Applesauce

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17 Responses

  1. Looks delicious, I’ve eaten something similar in Central Asia.

    • Alina says:

      Thank you Three-Cookies! So you’ve been to Central Asia, sounds like you’ve traveled a lot!

  2. Amanda says:

    They look really yummy!

  3. Tricia says:

    And now I know where the word rugelach comes from! Thanks for another great recipe.

    • Alina says:

      Hey, I didn’t think of that! I’ve never had rugelach but I googled it and yes, it looks very similar. Thank you for your input Tricia!

  4. Jamielyn says:

    Wow these look fantastic! YUM!! Can’t wait to explore you blog!

    xoxo-
    Jamielyn
    I ♥ Nap Time

  5. They look so good! Yum! What wonderful happy photos :-)

  6. These look so tasty. Perfect for a nice brunch! =)

  7. yum, I forgot about rogaliki - used to be my childhood favs.

    I’m making a Baltic brunch in a few weeks time, am looking for inspiration, this may be one!

  8. Joy says:

    The cookies look wonderful.

  9. Rimma says:

    Alina, what brand is your chocolate applesauce and where did you get it? I haven’t seen it in New York.

    • Alina says:

      Hi Rimma - Stano’s Mom makes chocolate applesauce at home! I can ask for the recipe when we see her in July, if you’re interested!

  10. Rimma says:

    Hi, Alina. I completely forgot about asking about the chocolate applesauce. I wonder if you got the recipe. I would like to have it. This should be really tasty filling!

  11. rheology gum says:

    Xanthan is a polysaccharide, such as sweets string which generated by fermentation from corn, and micro organism, generally in foodstuffs merely 1~5 utilised to modify meals texture.

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