Russian Season

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Russian, Eastern European and international cuisine brought to you by a mother and a daughter

About RussianSeason.net

Welcome to RussianSeason.net - a food blog run by a mother and a daughter living in Latvia. We both cook, while Alina writes the posts and takes photos.

We love to explore national cuisines from all corners of the world, with a focus on foods from Russia, Eastern Europe, the Baltics, former USSR… you know what we’re talking about! Being Russians ourselves, we’d love to spread some knowledge about Eastern European cuisine, which is, in our opinion, quite underestimated and unexplored.

This is a personal blog - so we do tweak and adapt most of those traditional recipes. Sometimes we change them a lot - to add a more “modern” touch, for example. Some of the recipes we invent from scratch. We’re sure that none of you blindly follows instructions where you think you can improve the recipe or adjust it to your family’s taste. We also keep in mind that our overseas visitors might not have access to all the ingredients available here, so we try to adapt the ingredients list and suggest substitutes.

We’ve been running this blog since summer 2009, so there’s a huge to-do list yet. The area we’d like to cover is so vast that we can never decide what to cook today. If you’re interested in learning more about Slavic/ex-USSR cooking, it’s a good idea to subscribe to RussianSeason and follow the updates. We’ll try our best to publish new recipes as often as possible. Although after the birth of little Ivanka this has become complicated :)

In January 2010, we launched a Slovak version of our blog. All recipes are translated by Stano who comes from Western Slovakia. He is currently living and working in Riga, Latvia, and raising the little Ivanka together with Alina.

We love to receive comments and emails. If you are looking for a particular Eastern European recipe, feel free to drop us a line and we’ll try to help you or put that recipe on our great waiting list. If you’re interested in a Latvian or Russian recipe, we can translate it into English. Please allow about a week for reply however, as we are usually unable to check our RS mail on weekdays.

We can also be found on Twitter, Flickr, Facebook, and FoodBuzz.

Publications and mentions:
Latvian Rye Bread Dessert - Foodista Best of Food Blogs Cookbook: 100 Great Recipes Photographs and Voices by Sheri L. Wetherell and Barnaby Dorfman and Colin M. Saunders (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2010)
Рецепт латышского блюда попал в американскую кулинарную книгу, созданную блоггерами - Rus.Delfi.lv, 18.10.2010.
Что едят блогеры? - “Час” (19.10.2010.)
Пирожное из хлеба - “Вести Сегодня” (19.10.2010.)
Best of the Web: Be @ Home #16, the bi-monthly review of the most intriguing sites on the web
Russian Easter Bread: Kulich on TheHungarianGirl.com
Rupjmaizes kartojums on Wikipedia

“Natalia and Alina are very knowledgeable about Russian, Polish and Slovak cooking (and others). Their photos are beautiful and they are very prompt in answering questions” - Barbara Rolek, Eastern European Food Guide, About.com

“You can find a Chinese restaurant in every city in America; Thai and Indian food have made culinary inroads; Italian is the favorite cuisine of many; and of course, French food is as coveted as ever: but have you ever had Eastern European food? Whether you know it or you don’t, Russian Season is worth getting excited about” - Best of the Web: Be @ Home #16

“This blog is quite peculiar because it was actually created by a mother and a daughter that are specialized in providing you with anything you need to know about Russian and Eastern European cuisine. You do not have to worry about unusual ingredients because all these recipes are adapted” - Killer Startups

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Our Flickr Photostream

ChurchkhelaWhite TulipsBaked Millet BarMillet BarsGreen and YellowCottage Cheese Apricot BunCottage Cheese Apricot BunPetushki LollpipopsChocolate Butter

Baking on Foodista